School of Molecular Sciences

Seminars

Seminar schedules

All Seminars are at 3:40PM in PSH151, unless otherwise stated.

Previous Seminars

1/19/2018

William Shih
Harvard University  
DNA-Origami Barrels

Abstract:
DNA origami, in which a long scaffold strand is assembled with a large number of short staple strands into parallel arrays of double helices, has proven a powerful method for custom nanofabrication. Although diverse shapes in 2D are possible, the single-layer rectangle has proven the most popular, as it features fast and robust folding and modular design of staple strands for simple abstraction to a regular pixel surface. Here we introduce a barrel architecture, built as stacked rings of double helices, that retains these appealing features, while extending construction into 3D. We demonstrate hierarchical assembly of a 100 megadalton barrel that is ~90 nm in diameter and ~270 nm in height, and that provides a rhombic-lattice canvas of a thousand pixels each, with a pitch of 9 nm, on its inner and outer surfaces. Complex patterns rendered on these surfaces were resolved using up to twelve rounds of exchange PAINT super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. We envision these structures as versatile nanoscale pegboards for applications requiring complex 3D arrangements of matter.
Host: Nicholas Stephanopoulos
1/26/2018

Bill Graves
ASU  Physics
TBA


Host: Neal Woodbury
2/2/2018

Brian Chait
 Rockefeller University
TBA


Host: Chad Borges
2/9/2018

Daphne Klotsa
University of North Carolina  
TBA


Host: Nicholas Stephanopoulos
2/16/2018

Hannah Shafaat
Ohio State University  
TBA


Host: Anne Jones
2/23/2018

Ronald Zuckermann
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab  
New Biomimetic Nanomaterials at the Intersection of Structural Biology and Polymer Science

Abstract:
A fundamental challenge in materials science is to create synthetic nanoarchitectures that rival the structural complexity found in nature. A promising bioinspired approach is to synthesize sequence- defined polymer chains that fold into precise protein-like structures. In order to efficiently produce such information-rich polymer sequences, we use the automated solid-phase submonomer synthesis method to generate sequence-defined peptoid polymers up to 50 monomers in length. The method uses readily available primary amine synthons, allowing hundreds of chemically diverse sidechains to be cheaply introduced. We use this method, along with with computational modeling, to design, synthesize, assemble and engineer a variety of protein-mimetic nanostructures. Here we examine peptoid sequences that can form highly ordered supramolecular assemblies of nanosheets and nanotubes, and compare their molecular structures to the fundamental structures found in biology.
Host: Neal Woodboury
3/2/2018

James C. Weisshaar
U. Wisconsin-Madison  
TBA


Host: Steve Pressť
3/9/2018


 
No seminar-spring break


Host:
3/16/2018

Wenwan Zhong
UC Riverside  
TBA


Host: Jia Guo
3/23/2018

Malcolm Forbes
Bowling Green State University  
TBA


Host: Gary Moore
3/30/2018

David Baker
University of Washington  
Eyring Lecture


Host: Neal Woodbury and Jeremy Mills
4/6/2018

Jing Yang
UCSD  
Epithelial-Mesenchymal Plasticity in Carcinoma Metastasis


Host: Jia Guo
4/13/2018

Juan Alfonzo
Ohio State University  
TBA


Host: Julian Chen
4/20/2018

Ayusman Sen
Penn State University  
Fantastic Voyage: Designing Self-Powered Nanobots

Abstract:
Self-powered nano and microscale moving systems are currently the subject of intense interest due in part to their potential applications in nanomachinery, nanoscale assembly, robotics, fluidics, and chemical/biochemical sensing. One of the more interesting recent discoveries has been the ability to design nano/microparticles, including molecules, which catalytically harness the chemical energy in their environment to move autonomously. These "bots" can be directed by chemical and light gradients. Further, our group has developed systems in which chemical secretions from the translating micro/nanomotors initiate long-range, collective interactions among the particles. This behavior is reminiscent of quorum sensing organisms that swarm in response to a minimum threshold concentration of a signaling chemical. In addition, an object that moves by generating a continuous surface force in a fluid can, in principle, be used to pump the fluid by the same catalytic mechanism. Thus, by immobilizing the nano/micromotors, we have developed nano/microfluidic pumps that transduce energy catalytically. These non-mechanical pumps provide precise control over flow rate without the aid of an external power source and are capable of turning on in response to specific analytes in solution.
Host: Steve Presse
8/17/2018


 
Reserved for P&T


Host:
8/24/2018


 
Reserved for P&T


Host:
8/31/2018


 
Reserved for P&T


Host:
11/22/2018
Thursday


 
Thanksgiving-no seminar


Host: