School of Molecular Sciences

Seminars

Seminar schedules

All Seminars are at 3:40PM in PSH151, unless otherwise stated.

Previous Seminars

10/19/2017
Thursday
6:30PM
PSH-150
Richard Royce Schrock
MIT  
Eyring General Lecture: A Discovery and a Nobel Prize 30 years Later

Abstract:
A catalytic reaction discovered in the 1960s allows one to break carbon-carbon double bonds and form new ones with remarkable ease. This "metathesis" reaction began to attract the interest of organic, inorganic, and polymer chemists because of its great potential in manipulating carbon-carbon bonds, which is a fundamental goal of organic chemistry. The metathesis reaction has continued to change how chemistry that involves carbon-carbon double bonds, in particular, is practiced in the laboratory and industry. In 1974 I was in the right place at the right time to make a discovery that helped us understand how this reaction works and have spent my career developing catalysts for it. In the process I also discovered catalysts that "metathesize" carbon-carbon triple bonds and one that will "break" the triple bond in dinitrogen (to give ammonia catalytically), a reaction that is crucial to all life on earth.
Host: Neal Woodbury
10/20/2017

Richard Royce Schrock
MIT  
Eyring Technical Lecture: Recent Advances in Olefin Metathesis by Molybdenum and Tungsten Catalysts

Abstract:
Advances in applications of the chemistry of Mo and W olefin metathesis catalysts in the last two years include the synthesis of monoaryloxide chloride imido catalysts, kinetically Z- or E-selective catalytic macrocyclic ring-closing metathesis, stereoselective (Z or E) olefin metathesis reactions that use electron-poor olefins (ClCH=CHCl and CF3CH=CHCF3), and ROMP reactions that yield cis,syndiotactic-A-alt-B copolymers from enantiomerically pure monomers. New applications rely on synthetic advances that include new approaches to monoaryloxide chloride complexes, to rare molybdenum oxo alkylidene complexes, and to previously unknown Mo=CHCl and Mo=CHCF3 complexes, which must be involved in reactions with the electron-poor olefins ClCH=CHCl and CF3CH=CHCF3.
Host: Neal Woodbury
10/27/2017

Ron Orlando
University of Georgia  
Challenges Associated with Glycoprotein Characterization: The More We Learn, the More We Realize How Much We Donít Know

Abstract:
The ability to accurately quantitate the glycan chains attached to glycoproteins has wide-ranging implications. Numerous studies over the past 40 years have demonstrated that abnormal glycosylation occurs in virtually all types of human cancers, and show the potential of using glycan markers in either a diagnostic or a prognostic manner. The glycosylation on recombinant protein therapeutics is also known to have profound effects, with one of the better-known examples being the increased serum half-life of erythropoietin (EPO) resulting from glycoengineering. Hence, the quantification of glycoprotein glycans plays important roles from the discovery of new diagnostic/prognostic markers to the development of therapeutic agents. A particularly challenging aspect is the identification and accurate quantitation of low abundance glycans that are present as minor components in complex isomeric mixtures. We are developing analytical strategies to overcome the limitations encountered in traditional glycan profiling/glycomic analysis. The use of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) is a central component as this allows for the separation of isomeric glycan structures. To facilitate identification and discovery of low-level glycans, we have created a HILIC retention model for native glycans, peptides, and glycopeptides, which also facilitates the analysis of other hydrophilic post-translational modifications such as deamidation and isomerization. This presentation will highlight our approach and demonstrate its utility for the detection and quantitation of individual linkage isomers and other PTMs in complex mixtures such as human serum glycans and therapeutic IgGs.
Host: Chad Borges
11/3/2017

Thomas Meade
Northwestern University  
Seeing is Believing: Coordination Chemistry and Molecular Imaging: A Marriage made In Vivo

Abstract:
MR imaging offers a non-invasive means to map structure and function by sampling the amount, flow or environment of water protons in vivo. Such intrinsic contrast can be augmented by the use of paramagnetic contrast agents in both clinical and experimental settings; however, these agents are typically anatomical reporters that label individual fluid compartments and distinguish tissues that are magnetically similar but histologically distinct. To permit a direct imaging of the physiological state of cells or organs, we have synthesized and in vivo tested new bio-activated MR imaging contrast probes that change their influence on nearby water protons in a conditional fashion. The agents modulate fast water exchange with the paramagnetic center, yielding distinct "strong" and "weak" relaxivity states and are modulated by two types of biological events: i. self-immolative enzymatic processing of the complex that is a reporter probe for lacZ (b-galactosidase and ii. binding of the intracellular messenger, Ca(II). These agents provide the ability to monitor gene expression and intracellular second messenger activity in the form of acquired 3D MR images.
Host: Anne Jones
11/10/2017


 
Veterans Day-No seminar


Host:
11/17/2017

Adam Barb
Iowa State University  
Asparagine-linked Glycosylation of Immunoglobulin G and the Fc γ Receptors Impacts Immune System Activation


Host: Xu Wang
1/19/2018

William Shih
Harvard University  
TBA


Host: Nicholas Stephanopoulos
1/26/2018

Bill Graves
ASU  Physics
TBA


Host: Neal Woodbury
2/2/2018

Brian Chait
 Rockefeller University
TBA


Host: Chad Borges
2/9/2018


 
TBA


Host:
2/16/2018

Hannah Shafaat
Ohio State University  
TBA


Host: Anne Jones
2/23/2018


 
No seminar-visitation weekend


Host:
3/2/2018

James C. Weisshaar
U. Wisconsin-Madison  
TBA


Host: Steve Pressť
3/9/2018


 
No seminar-spring break


Host:
3/16/2018


 
TBA


Host:
3/23/2018


 
TBA


Host:
3/30/2018

David Baker
University of Washington  
Eyring Lecture


Host: Neal Woodbury and Jeremy Mills
4/6/2018

Jing Yang
UCSD  
TBA


Host: Jia Guo
4/13/2018

Juan Alfonzo
Ohio State University  
TBA


Host: Julian Chen
4/20/2018

Ayusman Sen
Penn State University  
TBA


Host: Steve Presse