School of Molecular Sciences

Seminars

Seminar schedules

All Seminars are at 3:40PM in PSH151, unless otherwise stated.

Previous Seminars

3/3/2017

Sharona Gordon
University of Washington  Physiology & Biophysics
Chemistry at the Membrane: Unnatural Approaches in a Natural Setting

Abstract:
The study of ion channel and transporters is at a technological apex, with high-resolution structural studies using cryoEM joining better-established high-resolution functional studies with patch-clamp electrophysiology. Limitation of these approaches, however, have left a gap in our understanding of membrane protein dynamics, particularly outside the ion-conducting pore. Using amber codon suppression to introduce a fluorescent, noncanonical amino acid along with transition metal ion FRET, we have developed a system to measure short-distance rearrangements within a membrane protein in a native cellular environment. This approach has the power to reveal the mechanisms of agonist-dependent activation and inactivation in the pain-transducing ion channel TRPV1.
Host: Wade Van Horn
3/10/2017


 
No Seminar-Spring Break


Host:
3/17/2017

Yossi Weizmann
University of Chicago  Department of Chemistry
Synthetic Nucleic Acid Topology and Colloidal LEGO-Like Nanoparticles for Biological and Plasmonic Applications

Abstract:
The iconic double helical structure of DNA has excited the imagination of both scientists and non-scientists for more than six decades. In recent times, the programmable nature of DNA has redefined its use as a powerful building material for the construction of precisely defined 2D and 3D nanoscale assemblies. The term “DNA structure” combines the chemical, stereochemical and biological advantages into one focus that can be applied to a wide range of scientific fields. The Weizmann group aims to demonstrate novel approaches that take DNA philosophy to a new level, with the potential application of DNA structure in biology, material science and nanomedicine studies. We focus on the fundamental design, functions and applications of highly programmable nucleic acids nanostructures. Our main research objective is the development of novel strategies and approaches providing versatile tools to form composite, nano-scaled, precisely-controlled structures and ultra-sensitive DNA machineries. The following research fields will be represented: (a) Design and applications of novel synthetic molecular topologies from programmable nucleic acids and their biological consequences for enzyme mechanisms, drug discovery, and drug delivery. (b) Synthesis of programmable assemblies of colloidal LEGO nanoparticles with specific and anisotropic bonding directionality for applications in self-assembly, plasmonics, and photothermal energy conversion for nucleic acids amplification.
Host: Hao Yan
3/24/2017

Angela Gronenborn
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine  
Synergy Between NMR, Cryo-EM and Large-Scale MD Simulations - An All Atom Model of a Native HIV Capsid


Host: Xu wang
3/31/2017

Scott Fraser
University of Southern California  Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering
Eavesdropping on the Signals, Lineages and Motions that Build Embryos


Host: Jia Guo
4/7/2017

Steven A. Soper
University of Kansas  Department of Chemistry
New Tools for Liquid Biopsies: Microfluidic Platforms for the Efficient Isolation and Molecular Profiling of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs), Cell Free DNA (cfDNA) and Nanovesicles (Exosomes)

Abstract:
Liquid biopsies are generating great interest within the biomedical community due to the simplicity for securing important biomarkers to manage complex diseases, such as many of the cancer-related diseases. These circulating markers consist of CTCs, cfDNA and exosomes. We are developing a suite of microfluidic devices that are can process whole blood directly and engineered to efficiently search for a variety of disease-associated liquid biopsy markers from divergent subpopulations comprising the tumor microenvironment that can supply complementary clinical information. Each microfluidic device can isolate the target with recovery >90% and sufficient purity (>80%) to enable downstream molecular analysis of the particular biomarker. The microfluidic devices are made from thermoplastics via injection molding to allow for mass-production of devices with tight compliancy to accommodate clinical implementation. In this presentation, information will be shared on the operational parameters of these devices for the selection of liquid biopsy markers, and the downstream molecular information that can be garnered from the isolated markers in diseases such as colorectal, ovarian, breast, pancreatic and prostate cancers as well as some of the liquid-based cancers (acute myeloid leukemia).
Host: Jia Guo
4/13/2017
Thursday
6:30 PM
PSH-150
Gerhard Wagner
Harvard Medical School  Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Eyring General Lecture: Solution NMR from a Chemist’s Tool to Solving Protein Structures


Host: Neal Woodbury
4/14/2017

Gerhard Wagner
Harvard Medical School  Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Eyring Technical Lecture: Engineering Phospholipid Nanodiscs for Membrane Protein Studies


Host: Neal Woodbury
4/21/2017

Steven Carr
Broad Institute  Proteomics Platform
Quantitative Proteomics in Biology and Medicine


Host: Chad Borges
8/25/2017


 
TBA


Host:
9/1/2017


 
TBA


Host:
9/8/2017


 
TBA


Host:
9/15/2017


 
TBA


Host:
9/22/2017

Richard Royce Schrock
MIT  
Eyring lecture TBA


Host: Neal Woodbury
9/29/2017


 
TBA


Host:
10/6/2017

Paul Cremer
Penn State University  
TBA


Host: Jia Guo
10/20/2017

Thomas Meade
Northwestern University  
TBA


Host: Anne Jones
10/27/2017


 
TBA


Host:
11/3/2017


 
TBA


Host:
11/10/2017


 
Veterans Day-No seminar


Host:
11/17/2017


 
TBA


Host: