School of Molecular Sciences

Seminars

Seminar schedules

All Seminars are on Fridays at 10:00 AM in Biodesign B (BDB) Auditorium B105, unless otherwise stated.

Previous Seminars

4/2/2020
Thursday
6:30 PM
PSH
Paul Weiss
University of Southern California  
General Lecture - Nanotechnology Approaches to Biology and Medicine

Abstract:
Biology functions at the nanoscale. Thus, there are special opportunities not only to make biological measurements using nanotechnology, but also to interact directly in order to influence biological outcomes. Nanoscience and nanotechnology developed from chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, medicine, toxicology, and a host of other fields. Along the way, we taught each other our problems, challenges, and approaches. The interdisciplinary communication skills that were developed and are now part of our training remain unique to the field. As a result, nanoscience contributes to a wide range of other fields, such as neuroscience and the microbiome.
Host: Ian Gould
4/3/2020

Paul Weiss
UCLA  
Technical Lecture - Precise Chemical, Physical, and Electronic Nanoscale Contacts

Abstract:
Two seemingly conflicting trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology are our increasing ability to reach the limits of atomically precise structures and our growing understanding of the importance of heterogeneity in the structure and function of molecules and nanoscale assemblies. By having developed the “eyes” to see, to record spectra, and to measure function at the nanoscale, we have been able to fabricate structures with precision as well as to understand the important and intrinsic heterogeneity of function found in these assemblies. The physical, electronic, mechanical, and chemical connections that materials make to one another and to the outside world are critical. Just as the properties and applications of conventional semiconductor devices depend on these contacts, so do nanomaterials, many nanoscale measurements, and devices of the future. We discuss the important roles that these contacts can play in preserving key transport and other properties. Initial nanoscale connections and measurements guide the path to future opportunities and challenges ahead. Band alignment and minimally disruptive connections are both targets and can be characterized in both experiment and theory. I discuss our initial forays into this area in a number of materials systems.
Host: Neal Woodbury
4/17/2020

Claudia Turro
Ohio State University  
Dual Action Photoactive Transition Metal Complexes for Photochemotherapy

Abstract:
The use of light to activate the action of a drug has become important as mode of cancer therapy, in some cases superior to traditional treatments, because it significantly less invasive and poses low levels of systemic toxicity to the patient. Photoinduced ligand exchange, which can be used to release drugs with spatiotemporal control, together with the production of 1O2, represent important reactions initiated by light with potential applications in photochemotherapy (PCT). These photoinduced reactions of Ru(II) complexes will be presented, along with their activity towards biological targets and cancer cells. Importantly, Ru(II) complexes were recently discovered to undergo multiple photochemical pathways following activation with light, and this property was used to design new dual-action compounds. These new complexes are able to both release a medically relevant compound and to produce 1O2 from the same molecule. These dual-action compounds were shown to exhibit significant enhancement of activity stemming from their ability to target cancer and/or induce cell death via two different, independent pathways. New strategies developed for the photoinduced exchange of pyridine-containing drugs and methods to selectively target cancer tissue. These new dual- action complexes provide a new platform for drug delivery and enhanced therapeutic activity upon excitation with low energy light.
Host: Gary Moore
4/24/2020

Sheryl L. Wiskur
University of South Carolina  
Asymmetric Silylation: Understanding catalyst substrate interactions and reaction selectivity

Abstract:
Asymmetric silylation has been employed recently to obtain enantiomercially enriched alcohols that have been difficult to obtain otherwise. We have also been exploring the mechanism of this reaction and the supramolecular interactions that control the selectivity of the reaction. Specifically, electrostatic interactions, such as cation-pi interactions are hypothesized to be one of many controlling factors in reaction selectivity, and we are interested in obtaining a better understanding of this supramolecular interaction as it relates to asymmetric catalysis. Our group uses physical organic techniques, such as linear free energy relationships, to understand reaction mechanisms which includes the intermolecular interactions that aid in controlling these reactions. In this talk we will show how we use our silylation-based kinetic resolution as a model reaction to explore how changes in the pi system of the substrate affect the selectivity of the reaction. Since the hypothesized intermediate is a silylated cationic catalyst, changes in the substrate’s pi system should affect the affinity to the catalyst which ultimately affects the selectivity. This talk will focus on some of these aspects, and some other new areas we are working in.
Host: Ryan Trovitch
8/20/2020
Thursday
1:30 PM
Jeremy Mills
 
P&T


Host: Ian Gould
8/21/2020
1:30 PM
Wei Liu
 
P&T


Host: Ian Gould
8/27/2020
Thursday
1:30 PM
Marcia Levitus
 
P&T


Host: Ian Gould
8/28/2020
1:30 PM
Alex Green
 
P&T


Host: Ian Gould
9/4/2020
1:30 PM
Nick Stephanopoulos
 
P&T


Host: Ian Gould
9/11/2020
1:30 PM
Anne Jones
 
P&T


Host: Ian Gould
9/25/2020

Mario R Capecchi
University of Utah  
Eyring Lecture


Host: Ian Gould
10/9/2020

Matthew Sigman
 
O'Keeffe Lecture -


Host: Anne Jones
11/20/2020

Omar Yaghi
 
TBA


Host: Ian Gould